Works

"There are two basic principles of musical structure I rely on. The first is expressed by the force of attraction, (gravity, love, concentration, creation), and the second lies in the idea of repetition, (materialization, duration). My mindfulness of this constitutes the only score. I find I must wait before the beginning of each performance until I am surprised by the first sound I make and the fact that it is made. Then, I feel ready to proceed."

Solo piano interfaced with Buchla 300 Electronic Music System, developed through improvisational practice.

Percussion, electronics, engineer. Lovely Music, Ltd., #LML-1021 and CD-1021, New York, 1977, [LP record and CD].

[PDF AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD] On Being Invisible: I. The qualities of change (1977), II. On being invisible (1978), III. Steps towards transitional topologies of musical form (1982). Musicworks, 28. (1984). (Toronto: Music Gallery), 10-13.

Documentation by Kate Craig of an early solo performance by Rosenboom of this work at the Western Front, Vancouver, Western Front Video, video, approx. 90 min.

By George Manupelli with performances of songs by Jacqueline Humbert, David Rosenboom, and George Manupelli, York University, Toronto, 16mm film, approx. 10 min.

[SCORE PDFs AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD.] With G. Manupelli, J. Humbert, M. Moulton, W. Winant, J. Tenney, A. Holloway, M. Byron, and C. Arnoldin, full length concert work for performance art ensemble, created originally for a performance by the Maple Sugar group at The Music Gallery, Toronto, 1977.

In Byron, M. (ed.). Pieces: a second anthology. (Toronto: Michael Byron Pub.), 105-114.
Also in Musicworks, 28. (1984). (Toronto: Music Gallery), 10-13.

Performed by NEXUS percussion group, CBC Recording, Toronto.

In Zimmermann, W. Desert plants: conversations with 23 American musicians. (Cologne and Vancouver: Beginner Press and Aesthetic Research Centre of Canada Publications), 183-192.

Concert encounter arranged for two previously unacquainted pianists, Charles McDermed and David Rosenboom, who perform without having visual contact with each other.

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